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Weitere Publikationen: Werner Hölzl (52 Treffer)

German Economic Review, 2021, https://doi.org/10.1515/ger-2021-0025
Auftraggeber: Europäische Kommission
Studie von: Österreichisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung – Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaftliches Rechenzentrum
We present an uncertainty measure that is based on a business survey in which uncertainty is captured directly by a qualitative question on subjective uncertainty regarding expectations. Uncertainty perceptions display persistence at the firm level and changes are associated with past business assessments and expectations. While our uncertainty measure correlates with commonly used alternatives, it is superior in forecasting and suggests a larger role of uncertainty shocks for aggregate fluctuations. Its informational content is highest when considering smaller firms or firms with a low growth rate. Our results confirm the feasibility of constructing uncertainty measures from business survey questions that elicit information on uncertainty of respondents directly.
This paper examines broad patterns of structural change for a large number of countries on a global scale and for a smaller set of advanced industrialised countries over time. The findings show that structural change over the past decades followed the three-sector hypothesis. The past decades were characterised by the rise of the service sector, driven especially by business services and non-market service. At the same time as manufacturing sectors are declining in terms of shares, they remain the sectors with the highest contributions to aggregate productivity growth. An analysis of determinants of structural change confirms that country competencies related to institutional quality, knowledge generation and industrial application of the new knowledge are an important driving force of structural changes towards services, but that they have a heterogeneous impact on manufacturing subsectors. High technology manufacturing share seems not to be characterised by a tendency to decline with the development of country competencies. Broad policy implications are discussed.
This paper examines the association between participation in global value chains and financial globalisation measured by international net and capital flows. The results show that financial globalisation and the rise of global value chains are related but not two sides of the same coin. In fact, we find that GVC participation is positively associated with equity capital flows but negatively associated with debt capital flows. We also study the association of GVC participation and capital flows with aggregate economic outcomes. The findings show that both GVC participation and equity flows affect the share of mortgage and business credit. But we uncover also important differences in the impact of capital flows between advanced and emerging countries. Regarding changes in the economic structure our results suggest a positive association of both GVC participation and equity inflows on the manufacturing share, while debt inflows are primarily associated with a growth of the service sector in advanced economies, but not in emerging and developing countries. The finding that there is no strong association between the globalisation indicators and innovation suggests that the fragmentation of value chains leads to functional specialisation in tasks and tends to weaken the link between innovation and production at country level. We find in addition that a higher GVC participation is weakly associated with a higher growth of government revenue, as are debt flows but only in advances countries. This finding suggests also that debt flows were redirected primarily into safe countries in advanced countries.
This paper explores the structural determinants of high-growth firm shares in Austrian regions. The regional level of analysis allows one to uncover regularities that are not detectable in firm-level studies. It is found that lower mobility barriers, firm exits and technological opportunities, measured by digitalization intensities, and, to a lesser extent, agglomeration effects are associated with a larger share of high-growth firms. The results suggest that comparisons of shares of high-growth firm across countries and regions should consider differences in the industrial structures together with the often-emphasized differences in policies and regulations.
in: Elias G. Carayannis, Encyclopedia of Creativity, Invention, Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Buchbeiträge, 2019, S.734-738
Computational Management Science, 2019, 16(4), S.621-649
We empirically explore the effect of broad firm strategies on firm growth using a representative sample of manufacturing firms from the European Community Innovation Survey 2012. We consider broad strategies related to innovation and marketing, cost efficiency, building alliances with other firms and institutions, organisational flexibility, and new geographical markets as explanatory factors of firm growth. Splitting our sample into frontier economies and catching-up countries accounts for different contexts that affect the interplay of strategy and firm growth. We implement quantile regressions to estimate conditional coefficients across the distribution of employment-based firm growth rates. High firm growth in frontier countries is associated with innovation, strategic alliances, and organisational flexibility. High firm growth in catching-up economies is supported by internationalisation strategies and strategic alliances. We find in addition that in catch-up countries being part of a foreign owned firm is conducive to high growth. Cost savings are negatively associated with firm growth in both country groups and marketing strategies do not seem to be associated with rapid firm growth.
in: Science, research and innovation performance of the EU
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